Dabbling in Denglisch

So I was planning on writing this great big post about how I ( and anyone who follows my tips) learned to manage conversational German so quickly. I then shortly realized it was utter nonsense because over the past 6 months I have been speaking less German and more Denglisch.

Dẹng·lisch

Combination of English and German spoken by expats in Germany  and Germans who keep on switching between both languages.

“Kannst Du mir morgen helfen to plan this out?”

For those who have transitioned into Denglisch, it really isnt a matter of being poor at one language or the other. Your skill set is voided, its mainly about the situation. When you have to use two languages often in daily life, no matter how disciplined or precise you are. Eventually you end up mixing them when the passendes Wort cannot be found.

It unfortunately is a  nasty habit one finds themselves in. People will ask me to translate a word from German to english and I’ll be like ” yea I totally understand what that is, but no my brain can’t compute my mother tongue right now” i.e lost in Dengleschion. I find my German skills have weakend and my english moderately deteriorated. I am sadly becoming a lazy linguist I fear.

It’s really interesting how becoming bilingual later on in life works out. The children I have previously cared for were all bilingual straight out of the womb, they have the ability to perfectly transition between language and seldom mix them up. Were as I over here have begun facing a handful linguistic nonsense:

  • Yodaspeak
    Since the German sentence structure is occasionaly backwards compared to the English, my American brain overthinks it decides that it should always be this way. I’ll find myself talking in english and blurting out phrases like ” I will the book soon read”

 

  • Or?

In German they always use an affirmation seeking “oder?” (or?) at the end of a sentence. Often  I find myself switching it in to my native english by asking my friends something like, “We will go later to the party or?” yea. smooth Aspen, congrats on your englischcchhh.

 

  • Scchh!

I realized I had been in Germany quite sometime when I started added c  to any words with an sh. Not only would I mistakingly write it down, but embarassingly enough pronounce it once and a while.

 

What are your biggest Denglisch-ues? Has anyone found a good way to stay on track and seperate their languages?  I would love to hear more about your tips and experiences. As I have only been learning German for two years now, It’s always great to hear from a fellow expat!

 

 

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2 thoughts on “Dabbling in Denglisch

  1. Hi Aspen,
    The Term “Denglish” is also used for german sayings that are translated into english word for word. You should look them up, they sound really funny. You can find these phrases on coffee mugs, T-Shirts, post cards etc. Examples are “My english is no the yellow from the egg” and “I understand only rail station”. There is even a book called “Denglish for betterknowers” 😀
    Great blog btw, but you should definitly do more videos with Hayley or start your own channel. 🙂
    Much Greetings. 😀
    Serkan

    Like

    1. Hey there Serkan,
      Thanks for the tip. yes, I find German translated literally so funny! I’ll have to check that book out.
      and dont worry, Hayley and I have some other videos planned for the future

      xx A

      Like

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