How to tip in Germany

One of the most underated questions I’ve faced is the act of tipping in a foreign country. It’s one of those little things that tend to go slid under the rug and when you find it, you are like wait wait hey what howwwwwww.

When I lived in France I was completelt baffled that no one tips at all and in some circumstances it was even considered rude to tip when you were recieving a service ( so odd right?-for an American at least!) in the states most individuals in the service industry live off of tips so we tend to focus on making sure we don’t forget and give the appropriet amount. Below is what I have come to learn and what to apply to various situations in Germany.*

*note these unwritten rules also tend to apply in German speaking parts of Switzerland and Austria

Tipping:

Wait Staff

This I found to be very interesting, both because of the difference in the states as well as my experience working as a waitress in Germany. When it comes to tipping at a resteraunt it is not uncommon to simply round the bill up to the nearest euro, however for a nicer sit down resteraunt the average is about 10%.

Although in groups this average changes to a table amount ( said to be around 15euro total sum) often you will notice that even as tedious as it is, wait staff are happy to split bills in between running around. They will most likely get a higher tip in total from all the split bills.

Helpful vocab: Zusammen (together) / Getrennt (seperate)

Bars

When going to a bar, same rules apply basically everywhere. If you are going up to the bar to grab some drinks and go then you simply round the bill to the nearest euro. However, if you are sitting down and being served by the bar staff, then the same rules apply to giving trinkgeld as if you were in a resteraunt.

Taxis

Taxis are a bit different than eating out or getting prettied up. For taxi drivers a smaller tip is normal. So typically between .50 to 2 euros would be acceptable. Similar to the bar rule, you generally just round up the fair.

Hairdressers

This is one question I was off to first seek out when I moved abroad. Since I need my monthly appointments, I always want to make sure I build a good relationship with my colourist. I know in the states people get really offended if you don’t tip after a hair service, but here it seems they are more casual. Regardless of that I do believe ( and have come to learn) that with good service a tip of around 10%-15% is the correct thing to do.

Helpful vocab: schneiden (cut)|waschen (wash)|föhnen (blow-dry)|Strähnchen (highlights)

Paying:

When paying a resteraunt bill in Germany, a couple things different from that of the US ( and other english speaking countries I have experienced) First off, the server will come to you and verbally count out the amount at your table and you will pay there ( even with card). When tipping you simply let them know the amount for your card or when giving bar specify what the tip is so they don’t start looking for change. For example, if I was at a cafe and my bill was €8.20 I would give them a ten euro note and say ” zehn” to let them know my tip was  €1.80. As self explanatory as that seems I can say from my experience as a waitress in Germany it is still very helpful. The worst is when you begin to count out all the ridiculous amount of change in your kellnerin geldbeutel only to be told that its ok.

A side not: when recieveing services in Germany you may notice the culture is a lot less..errmmm.. “Friendly” than that of North American. This is due to the fact that they are not living off of tips and have a legal and very well regulated wage. So do not expect much over enthusiastic customer service during your visit. It is not them being rude but simply just culturally different. This is one of the main reasons you never are expected to tip over 10%.

Advertisements

One thought on “How to tip in Germany

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s